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Jane Doe Stop Killer Robots

As humans, we approach everyday decision-making through the lens of our own individual moral codes, each shaped by our culture, class, beliefs, and ethics.

These moral codes help us make the 'right' decisions in complex situations. But ask yourself, what would your answer be if you were faced with a complex moral problem - what would your moral code tell you if that decision meant the difference between life and death?

Autonomy in weapons systems is a human problem at its core, and 'Killer Robots' (Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems, or LAWs) completely change the relationship between people and technology by putting life and death decisions in the hands of machines. Exploring the limits of binary thinking, we investigate the human condition in relation to moral situations.

We pose hypothetical life or death questions to interviewees and, devoid of context they have only binary decisions to choose from - yes or no. Kill, or don't kill. With a series of experts with first-hand knowledge of thIs fast-developing technology, we delve deeper into each of the subjects raised, looking closely at these moral issues and their impact in relation to autonomous weapon systems.

Immoral Code contemplates the impact of Killer Robots in a digitally dehumanised future. A near-future where human morals are obsolete. It's an increasingly familiar prospect where decision-making is a digital process and the result of algorithic processing - devoid of the context that comes from human insight. We ask in what context is it morally and socially acceptable to take a life? And importantly, would a computer know the difference?

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Governments and private companies are actively developing weapons that automate the decision to use force, without restriction or limitation. We believe that technology should be used to empower all people, not to reduce us – to stereotypes, labels, or just a pattern of 1’s and 0’s.

Support our campaign to Stop Killer Robots

Meet the participants

Name and Name

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Name and Name

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Name and Name

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The Art of Immoral Code

Killer Robots and Automated Weaponry, whilst driven by technology, are fundamentally a human issue. And so, when it came to planning how we launch the Immoral Code film, we knew we wanted that to come through loud clear - to share the vibrancy and eclectic nature of human endeavour, and at the same time contribute something positive to the world around us.

So rather than pour money into traditional advertising methods, have an agency create a killer cover image and share it for all the world to see, we instead commissioned a series of artists to give us their take on the issues presented in the film.

And we could not be more proud of the outcome!

I knew I wanted to play with the idea that robots can be given somewhat ‘human’ features to try and make them seem less threatening and more trustworthy - yet adding these likenesses always ends up really unsettling to me.

Anni Jyn Artist

We’ve has some incredible pieces created for us. From street artist Fokawolf’s uniquely subversive take on a common digital interface, through Anni Jyn’s beautiful and haunting hand-drawn robotic figures, and on to YAYA’s colourful and uniquely recognisable and humorous characters - they all approach the subject in a different way - extending the story of immoral code further with their unique interpretation of the film’s message. And technology has played a big part in many of these pieces too – VOID ONE’s use of Augmented Reality brings his mecha piece to life beautifully, giving an extra dimension to his works, and UNDUN has brough binary code to life in vibrant colour, dutifully recreating a portrait of a woman in a sea of 1s and 0s, each individually coloured to demonstrate the diversity and complexity of human decision-making.

We’re going to be sharing the works of all the artists involved through our social media channels but also be sure to keep an eye out in cities across the globe as we seek to spread our posters far and wide. We’ll also be having regular giveaways featuring these unique works as well as sticker packs featuring art from all the artists involved.

Immoral Code is a documentary created by the Stop Killer Robots campaign. It is produced, shot, and edited by Nice and Serious production house.